Women & Handguns Part 1

Guys that can shoot or know a lot about guns like to think they can shoot or know a lot about guns. Especially, when it comes to women. They want to the the MAN and show them how to shoot them and help them pick what they need to shoot.

Well, you might buy naughty nighties for a woman and she might wear them, but she is probably only doing it for you. (How would you feel with a strip of lace up your butt crack?)

My point is, (And I think Gunsite instructor Il Ling will agree.) a handgun is a very personal thing, if you don’t think so, send me some cash and I’ll pick your next one for you. Conventional wisdom has always been to get a J-frame or compact revolver for a woman because they are safe and easy to shoot.

Gunsite Instructor Il Ling speaking to a class of women shooters.

Today on the range we had snubby revolvers, compact 380s and 1911s in 9mm. The following observations from seven women of various shooting skill levels were:

38 Snub nose revolvers kick to hard.

Revolver triggers are too hard to pull.

Compact 380s are nice, especially the 1911 clones like the SIG and Colt (Colt may reintroduce the Mustang by the way – This focus group will surely impact that decision.)

1911 9mm handguns are easy to shoot and have great triggers. (Specifically the Colt Defender.)

Easy to see front sights are a good thing. (Specifically XS Big Dots)

NONE OF THIS SHOULD COME AS A SURPRISE, JEFF COOPER BELIEVED A GUN NEEDED TO HAVE SIGHTS YOU COULD SEE AND A TRIGGER YOU COULD OPERATE.

So, if you are thinking about getting a gun for your significant other, don’t just go buy one and surprise her, best let here shoot some guns and let her decide what she can handle.

Oh, and, for all those police administrators and shooters that think a 1911 is too complicated or maybe unsafe for a woman or a new shooter…We did not have a single accident on the range today.

Today, one of the things that really stood out to me with the women shooters was they were much more interested in how well they could operate and shoot the gun than they were with what it said on the side, or what someone else told them about it.

That’s a neat concept that maybe guys could learn from. Find something that works for YOU.

Advertisements

About gunwriter

Born and raised in the West Virginia hills, Richard literally grew up in the woods. He has chased coon hounds until daylight, waited out whitetails perched high in an oak, canoed the New River and hunted from the Montana Mountains to the Green Hills of Africa. During service in the Army and later as a municipal police officer and Special Agent with the railroad police, Richard obtained numerous certifications in small arms instruction. He has trained military personnel, law enforcement officers and civilians in the application of firearms for defensive, competitive and recreational use. Richard won the West Virginia Governor’s Twenty Award for law enforcement, the West Virginia National Guard State Pistol Competition and earned his Distinguished Medal with pistol. Badge turned in, Richard is now a contributing editor for several magazines. He was the compiling author of the book, Rifle Bullets for the Hunter and conceptualized and contributed to Selecting and Ordering a Custom Hunting Rifle. Richard also contributed a chapter to the John Velke book, The True Story of the Baldwin-Felts Detective Agency. Richard has patents on a riflescope reticle and a revolutionary bullet testing media. A hillbilly at heart, Richard lives on Shadowland - his shooting range in West Virginia - with the most understanding wife in the world, their three kids and a very protective ridgeback hound.
This entry was posted in JUST ANOTHER DAY. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Women & Handguns Part 1

  1. Pingback: Holsters & Skinny Hips | EMPTY CASES

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s